Angina is chest pain or discomfort you feel when there is not enough blood flow to your heart muscle.
Your heart muscle needs the oxygen that the blood carries. Angina may feel like pressure or a squeezing
pain in your chest. It may feel like indigestion. You may also feel pain in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw,
or back. Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common heart disease. CAD happens
when a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, reducing blood flow.
There are three types of angina: Stable angina is the most common type. It happens when the heart is working harder than usual. Stable angina has a regular pattern. Rest and medicines usually help.
Unstable angina is the most dangerous. It does not follow a pattern and can happen without physical exertion. It does not go away with rest or medicine. It is a sign that you could have a heart attack soon. Variant angina is rare. It happens when you are resting. Medicines can help.

Coronary artery disease develops when your coronary arteries — the major blood vessels that supply your heart with blood, oxygen and nutrients — become damaged or diseased. Cholesterol-containing deposits (plaque) in your arteries and inflammation are usually to blame for coronary artery disease. When plaques build up, they narrow your coronary arteries, decreasing blood flow to your heart. Eventually, the decreased blood flow may cause chest pain (angina), shortness of breath, or other coronary artery disease signs and symptoms. A complete blockage can cause a heart attack. Because coronary artery disease often develops over decades, it can go unnoticed until you have a heart attack. But there’s plenty you can do to prevent and treat coronary artery disease. Start by committing to a healthy lifestyle.

Cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee) refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases have many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. In rare cases, the muscle tissue in the heart is replaced with scar tissue.As cardiomyopathy worsens, the heart becomes weaker. It’s less able to pump blood through the body and maintain a normal electrical rhythm. This can lead to heart failure or irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias (ah-RITH-me-ahs). In turn, heart failure can cause fluid to build up in the lungs, ankles, feet, legs, or abdomen. The weakening of the heart also can cause other complications, such as heart valve problems.OverviewThe main types of cardiomyopathy are:Dilated cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic (hi-per-TROF-ik) cardiomyopathy Restrictive cardiomyopathy Arrhythmogenic (ah-rith-mo-JEN-ik) right ventricular dysplasia (dis-PLA-ze-ah) Other types of cardiomyopathy sometimes are referred to as “unclassified cardiomyopathy.” Cardiomyopathy can be acquired or inherited. “Acquired” means you aren’t born with the disease, but you develop it due to another disease, condition, or factor. “Inherited” means your parents passed the gene for the disease on to you. Many times, the cause of cardiomyopathy isn’t known. Cardiomyopathy can affect people of all ages. However, people in certain age groups are more likely to have certain types of cardiomyopathy. This article focuses on cardiomyopathy in adults. Outlook Some people who have cardiomyopathy have no signs or symptoms and need no treatment. For other people, the disease develops quickly, symptoms are severe, and serious complications occur. Treatments for cardiomyopathy include lifestyle changes, medicines, surgery, implanted devices to correct arrhythmias, and a nonsurgical procedure. These treatments can control symptoms, reduce complications, and stop the disease from getting worse.

We know how to save your Heart MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION A heart attack results when a blood clot completely obstructs a coronary artery supplying blood to the heart muscle and heart muscle dies. The blood clot that causes the heart attack usually forms at the site of rupture of an atherosclerotic, cholesterol plaque on the inner wall of a coronary artery. The most common symptom of heart attack is chest pain. The most common complications of a heart attack are heart failure and ventricular fibrillation. The risk factors for atherosclerosis and heart attack include elevated cholesterol levels, increased blood pressure, tobacco use, diabetes, male gender, and a family history of heart attacks at an early age. You should call for an ambulance immediately if you develop severe chest pain. Treatment with a clot-busting medicine or an emergency procedure to restore the
1:blood flow through the blocked blood vessel are usually done as soon as possible. This is to prevent or minimise any damage to your heart muscle.
2:There are seven main steps you can take to help prevent a heart attack (as well as stroke):Eat a healthy, balanced diet. control ur weight & cholesterol
tryto keep your blood pressure at a healthy level. Control sugar. Do exercise

The heart is a muscular organ about the size of a fist, located just behind and slightly left of the breastbone. The heart pumps blood through the network of arteries and veins called the cardiovascular system.
The heart has four chambers:
The right atrium receives blood from the veins and pumps it to the right ventricle.
The right ventricle receives blood from the right atrium and pumps it to the lungs, where it is loaded with oxygen.
The left atrium receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it to the left ventricle.
The left ventricle (the strongest chamber) pumps oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. The left ventricle’s vigorous contractions create our blood pressure. The coronary arteries run along the surface of the heart and provide oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle. A web of nerve tissue also runs through the heart, conducting the complex signals that govern contraction and relaxation. Surrounding the heart is a sac called the pericardium.

The kidneys are a pair of organs located in the back of the abdomen. Each kidney is about 4 or 5 inches long — about the size of a fist. The kidneys’ function are to filter the blood. All the blood in our bodies passes through the kidneys several times a day. The kidneys remove wastes, control the body’s fluid balance, and regulate the balance of electrolytes. As the kidneys filter blood, they create urine, which collects in the kidneys’ pelvis — funnel-shaped structures that drain down tubes called ureters to the bladder. Each kidney contains around a million units called nephrons, each of which is a microscopic filter for blood. It’s possible to lose as much as 90% of kidney function without experiencing any symptoms or problems.

What is the liver and what does the liver do? The liver is the largest internal organ and is the second most important organ in your body. The liver is located under your rib cage on the right side. It weighs about three pounds and is shaped like a football that is flat on one side. The liver carries out a grab bag of functions; this diversity makes it truly irreplaceable. Among its duties are the following: synthesis and assembly of proteins production of bile, a substance which digests fats helps to manage energy stores and contributes to childhood growth breaks down toxic substances plays a role in blood pressure managementCommon symptoms of liver disease Feeling of Dizziness • Stroke • Redness and itchiness of eyes • Short temperedness and constant irritation • Tension and pain in the back • Hypochondriac pain • Loss of flexibility of tendons and ligaments • Depression • Mood Swings • Headache • Jaundice • Appetite • Digestion • Problem of skin • Allergy • Tinnitus • Ticks, Spasms and Tremors • Sudden SeizuresList of Liver Disease
1. Acetaminophen Toxicity
2. Alcoholic Liver Disease
3. Liver Cirrhosis
4. Primary Liver Cancer
5. Liver Cysts
6. Liver Fibrosis
7. Fatty Liver Disease
8. Hepatitis

What Causes Cancer? Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by out-of-control cell growth. There are over 100 different types of cancer, and each is classified by the type of cell that is initially affected. Cancer harms the body when damaged cells divide uncontrollably to form lumps or masses of tissue called tumors (except in the case of leukemia where cancer prohibits normal blood function by abnormal cell division in the blood stream). Tumors can grow and interfere with the digestive, nervous, and circulatory systems, and they can release hormones that alter body function. Tumors that stay in one spot and demonstrate limited growth are generally considered to be benign. c2 More dangerous, or malignant, tumors form when two things occur: a cancerous cell manages to move throughout the body using the blood or lymph systems, destroying healthy tissue in a process called invasion that cell manages to divide and grow, making new blood vessels to feed itself in a process called angiogenesis. When a tumor successfully spreads to other parts of the body and grows, invading and destroying other healthy tissues, it is said to have metastasized. This process itself is called metastasis, and the result is a serious condition that is very difficult to treat.